State Legislative and Regulatory Activity Update, February 19, 2013

In Illinois, Senators Andy Manar (D) and Chapin Rose (R) filed separate bills prohibiting the Illinois Student Assistance Commission from making Monetary Award Program (MAP) grants to student attending qualified private sector colleges and universities. Undercurrent law, students attending Higher Learning Commission accredited institutions meeting the state's specified criteria are eligible for the grants. According to a Champaign–Urbana News-Gazette, the state awarded about $411 million in MAP grants for the 2011-2012 school year. "Of that, close to $24 million, or 6 percent, went to help pay for students' tuition at for-profit schools." 

The Utah Senate unanimously approved legislation that eliminates the regional accreditation requirement for nursing programs clearing the measure for Governor Herbert's signature. The bill retains a programmatic accreditation requirement, but adds language stipulating that the Nursing Board may establish rules allowing "for nursing education program to qualify for a limited time asan approved education program for the purpose of qualifying graduates for licensure under this chapter, prior to its obtaining an accreditation described in Subsection (1)."

Finally, legislation passed the Mississippi House of Representatives that prohibits any person employed by an institution licensed by the Commission on Proprietary School and College Registration, regardless of job title, job description, full-time or part-time employment status, from directly or indirectly influencing the decision of any prospective student to enroll for a fee in a course of instruction without first securing a permit as an agent from the Commission on Proprietary School and College Registration.

The bill, H.B. 614, which contains numerous other provisions of interestto institutions regulated by the Commission, passed the House by a vote of 117-1 and has been referred to the Senate. Similar legislation, S.B. 2786, wasapproved by the Senate on February 6th.  

In Illinois, Senators Andy Manar (D)and Chapin Rose (R) filed separate bills prohibiting the Illinois Student Assistance Commission from making Monetary Award Program (MAP) grantsto student attending qualified private sector colleges and universities. Undercurrent law, students attending Higher Learning Commission accredited institutions meeting the state's specified criteria are eligible for the grants. According to a Champaign–Urbana News-Gazette, the state awarded about $411 million in MAP grants for the2011-2012 school year. "Of that, close to $24 million, or 6 percent, went tohelp pay for students' tuition at for-profit schools." 

The Utah Senate unanimously approved legislation that eliminates the regional accreditation requirement for nursing programs clearing the measure for Governor Herbert's signature. The bill retains a programmatic accreditation requirement, but adds language stipulating that the Nursing Board may establishrules allowing "for nursing education program to qualify for a limited time as an approved education program for the purpose of qualifying graduates for licensure under this chapter, prior to its obtaining an accreditation describedin Subsection (1)."

Finally, legislation passed the Mississippi House of Representatives that prohibits any person employed by an institution licensed by the Commission on Proprietary School and College Registration, regardless of job title, job description, full-time or part-time employment status, fromdirectly or indirectly influencing the decision of any prospective student to enroll for a fee in a course of instruction without first securing a permit asan agent from the Commission on Proprietary School and College Registration.

 

The bill, H.B. 614, which contains numerous other provisions of interest to institutions regulated by the Commission, passed the House by a vote of 117-1 and has been referred to the Senate. Similar legislation, S.B. 2786, was approved by the Senate on February 6th.  

APSCU Facts

800k graduates

PSCUs open doors to many of the 13 million unemployed and 90 million undereducated Americans by providing a skills-based education. To remain competitive over the next decade, we must identify between 8 and 23 million new workers with postsecondary skills.PSCUs are a necessary part of that solution, having produced over 800,000 degrees last year alone.