Media Contact:
Noah Black
noah.black@apscu.org


APSCU Donates Time and Resources to Local DC Elementary School to Increase Literacy

every week, APSCU Staff members read to DCPS students during lunchtime


As part of its commitment to education and to give back to the local community, APSCU staff members joined dozens of DC employers in supporting Everybody Wins! DC, a non-profit organization committed to promoting children’s literacy and a love of learning through shared reading experiences. 


Everybody Wins! DCNine APSCU staff members participated in Everybody Wins’ Power Lunch program, devoting 126 hours to mentoring students at Ross Elementary School in Washington, DC. The program pairs an adult with an elementary school student to read together on a weekly basis during the student’s lunch hour.


The goals of the Power Lunch program aim to encourage a child’s interest in reading, expand a child’s opportunities for success, and facilitate meaningful volunteer contributions. Thanks to APSCU’s efforts, the students at Ross Elementary have read over 913 new books and learned 444 new words in the 2013-2014 schoolyear.


“APSCU is committed to providing access and opportunity to education and through mentorship, the Everybody Wins! Power Lunch program encourages a lifetime of reading and learning that puts students on the path to educational success,” said APSCU President and CEO Steve Gunderson. “It’s wonderful that my colleagues join thousands in the DC-community in providing students with a chance to read and learn every week.”


APSCU plans to renew its contribution and participation for the 2014-2015 schoolyear.
 

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PSCUs open doors to many of the 13 million unemployed and 90 million undereducated Americans by providing a skills-based education. To remain competitive over the next decade, we must identify between 8 and 23 million new workers with postsecondary skills. PSCUs are a necessary part of that solution, having produced over 800,000 degrees last year alone.