Media Contact:
Noah Black
noah.black@apscu.org


June 11, 2012
  
Contacts:
Heather Greenaway, 571-215-6151


APSCU Issues New Oversight Tenets For Veteran Success

Career Colleges & Universities Establish Principles & Offer Insight For Upcoming Senate Hearing

(WASHINGTON, D.C.) – The Association of Private Sector Colleges and Universities (APSCU) today announced the release of its “Five Tenets of Veterans Education,” a set of core principles and standards by which career-sector educational institutions will ensure positive outcomes for veterans, spouses, and dependents who attend their schools and ensure they have the right to choose the best education for their needs and goals.
 
These tenets include a renewed focus on: 1) Veteran counseling; 2) Disclosure rules governing all institutions of higher education; 3) A centralized complaint system developed with sector input; 4) Collaborative work with the federal government on veteran outcomes; and 5) APSCU convening a special Blue Ribbon Commission that will facilitate a series of panels on the issue.
 
“Private sector colleges and universities play an absolutely integral role in the lives and advancements of our men and women in uniform and veterans,” said Steve Gunderson, president and CEO of the Association of Private Sector Colleges and Universities (APSCU).  “These tenets underscore the critical need to accommodate veterans as they seek new opportunities on the home front while transitioning into civilian life.  We must always keep in mind that these non-traditional students are faced with unique challenges that require a distinctively designed educational system.”
 
The move is part of an overall effort to aggressively address the sector’s growing veteran population as it provides learning opportunities for over 150,000 men and women in uniform, their spouses, and dependents.  It also comes in advance of a hearing conducted by the U.S. Senate Committee on Veterans Affairs scheduled this Wednesday, June 13th in which lawmakers will discuss legislation seeking to enhance economic opportunities for veterans.

“Our soldiers have made great sacrifices for our country,” Gunderson concluded.  “It is only appropriate that colleges and universities also make the necessary sacrifices to provide quality and tailored curriculum, as well as flexible services.  All institutions of higher education, regardless of tax status, should be held accountable to high standards when it comes to military and veteran’s education.  We hope the U.S. Senate Committee on Veterans Affairs will take this into consideration when discussing legislation this week.” 
 
View APSCU’s “Five Tenets of Veterans Education".

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PSCUs open doors to many of the 13 million unemployed and 90 million undereducated Americans by providing a skills-based education. To remain competitive over the next decade, we must identify between 8 and 23 million new workers with postsecondary skills. PSCUs are a necessary part of that solution, having produced over 800,000 degrees last year alone.